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Nolan Reed
Nolan Reed

New York Taxi Simulator


The electric air taxi demonstration in NYC is a massive milestone for the partnership and sustainable air transportation. BETA has already had test pilots from the US Air Force and Army fly the ALIA-250 in full-pattern evaluations.




New York Taxi Simulator



Yellow and green taxi trip records include fields capturing pick-up and drop-off dates/times, pick-up and drop-off locations, trip distances, itemized fares, rate types, payment types, and driver-reported passenger counts. The data used in the attached datasets were collected and provided to the NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC) by technology providers authorized under the Taxicab & Livery Passenger Enhancement Programs (TPEP/LPEP). The trip data was not created by the TLC, and TLC makes no representations as to the accuracy of these data.


Increased awareness of and experience with the way Joby air taxis, other AAM aircraft, and self-flying drones will operate once aloft will also permit the development of potential departure, approach, and missed approach scenarios, as well as obstacle avoidance maneuvers.


The project aims to establish basepoints of altitude, maneuverability, and ride quality for future tests, and identify the best operating practices for AAM vehicles. In addition, NASA says it will be using data from the simulator trials to produce autopilot code, and navigation information specific to air taxis for use in airborne navigation system databases.


The computerised suburb, complete with its own unpredictable pedestrians, cyclists and traffic, features on the UK's first fully realistic bus simulator to be launched on 22nd November at Willesden Junction depot. The simulator is jointly funded by Transport for London and bus operator First, and has been specially adapted for London's buses, right down to the look and feel of the full-size cab.


Firsdon's layout is based on generic London streets, while its bus depot is a virtual replica of the one at Westbourne park and its bus station is a computerised version of Walthamstow station. The simulator provides detailed, co-ordinated graphics through the windscreen and rear-view mirrors to give the look and feel of a real bus journey. Single, double-decker and articulated (bendy) buses can all be simulated to run in the virtual world.


Training leaders can set up scenarios replicating some of the worst problems a London bus driver might encounter, from heavy traffic to terrible weather. A separate control console allows the instructor to interact with the trainee by changing traffic signals, opening car doors or controlling a virtual pedestrian, taxi or cyclist. Trainees in the cab feel the wheel judder if they run into the kerb and can sense the difference in the way the bus handles when the 'weather' makes the road conditions slippery.


The simulator will not replace real life driver training out on the road, but it will support and enhance it. Safety studies show that simulators can decrease preventable accidents by as much as 43%.


Andy Thompson, Performance Manager, Transport for London said: "Driving the simulator feels uncannily real, especially if you are familiar with the areas of London that are reproduced in the bus station and depot. I firmly believe that the chance to improve driving skills in the simulator as well as on the road will make a difference, not only to new bus drivers, but existing ones too."


Tony Wilson, Managing Director of First's bus operations in London, said: "Our bus drivers are amongst the most professional and highly skilled drivers on our roads today, helping millions of people every year to get where they need to be, safely and on time. This simulator will become part of First's comprehensive training programme that helps drivers to train for the challenges they will face every day on the roads of the capital." 041b061a72