top of page

Group

Public·8 members
Miles Turner
Miles Turner

Elite Gymnastics - NEU 92 2011.zip



This advanced mental rotation performance in athletes was investigated in detail inseveral other studies concentrating on specific sport practice. In one study it wasshown that two groups of athletes, namely (a) gymnasts who used mental and physicalrotations in their practice and (b) athletes whose activities required very littlerotation, showed a better mental rotation performance than non-athletes (Ozel, Larue, & Molinaro, 2002).Furthermore, a study revealed that elite athletes who completed daily practice of acombat sport (fencing, judo, and wrestling) showed a higher mental rotationperformance than elite runners (Moreau,Mansay-Dannay, Clerc, & Guerrien, 2011). Recently, Jansen, Lehmann,and Van Doren (2012) showed that soccerplayers demonstrated an improved mental rotation performance (in this case shorterRTs) compared to non-athletes in a chronometric mental rotation task, but only withembodied figures and not with cube figures. This effect was only found for embodiedfigures and might be explained by the fact that soccer players are trained torecognize the manipulation of bodies in space (the field). Since rotation speed didnot differ between soccer-players and non-athletes, the better mental rotationperformance might be attributable to more advanced encoding of the stimuli and notto the rotation process itself. Soccer players were chosen to be investigated basedon the idea that they are trained by perceiving space and objects from anon-egocentric point of view and thus should be better at object-basedtransformations. However, this study was limited by the fact that only male soccerplayers participated and not athletes from other sports or female athletes. Soccerplayers are trained to perceive objects and to analyze spatial relationships from anon-centered point of view, whereas for example gymnasts are mostly trained in theirown body transformation around all three axes (Steggemann, Engbert, & Weigelt, 2011).




Elite Gymnastics - NEU 92 2011.zip


Download Zip: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fjinyurl.com%2F2uc2cq&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw1HVrMThdJgUh6GtaDN8G7W



The American Cup, formerly known as the AT&T American Cup through a sponsorship arrangement that ended in 2018,[1] was an elite senior level international gymnastics competition that had been held in the United States from 1976 to 2020. It was usually held in February or March of each year. In 2011, it became part of the International Federation of Gymnastics (FIG) Artistic Gymnastics World Cup series. With the exception of 2005 (when the competition was also part of the FIG World Cup series), it has been exclusively an all-around competition.[2] Past champions include Olympic all-around champions Nadia Comăneci, Mary Lou Retton, Vitaly Scherbo, Paul Hamm, Carly Patterson, Nastia Liukin, Gabby Douglas, and Simone Biles. The final American Cup took place on March 7, 2020, in Milwaukee.[3]


The amount of training necessary to develop elite-level sports skills has long been debated. Ericsson et al defined the necessary components for expert skill acquisition in musicians, and these concepts have been extrapolated to sports.16 To achieve expertise, musicians must practice 10 000 hours over 10 years. This intense practice is more likely to be successful if begun during the early years of development. Lesser practice and a delayed start resulted in less expertise. In contrast, others believe that fewer hours are needed to achieve elite-level skills and that intense specialized training is more effective during later stages of development.42


For the next 34 years, from 1979 through the end of the original Big East structure in 2013, UConn would grow from a regional athletics program with regional success to a broad-based nationally-elite athletics department boasting multiple national championships in four different sports.


Prior to Coach Calhoun's arrival at UConn, Connecticut was a successful New England program but had only earned four NCAA Tournament wins in its history. During Jim Calhoun's 26 years as head coach (1986-2012), UConn became an elite national-level program, claiming three NCAA National Championships (1999, 2004, 2011), adding an NIT Championships (1988), and winning 48 NCAA Tournament games, along with 17 Big East Conference regular season (10) and tournament titles (7).